How to Calculate Your Startup Business Taxes

By October 13, 2020Tax, Tax Credits
startup tax tips credits advice

All tech startups face one common issue: paying taxes to the IRS. You are still trying to find your footing in the business world, and just when you think you couldn’t spend more money, the government steps in to remind you that you have a statutory obligation to pay taxes.

Keeping up with your tax obligations can be tedious, but any misstep can result in huge tax bills.  Here are the most common taxes you should always keep in mind.

Are Tech Companies Tax Exempt?

No. Tech companies are required to pay federal tax. For a company to be tax-exempt, the founders shouldn’t make any profits from it. These companies generally fall under religion, public social benefits, culture & arts, human services, or health organizations.

Even though tax-exempt companies don’t have to pay federal tax, they are still liable for local income & state tax, and all donations made to them are tax-deductible.

Which Types of Taxes Should Tech Companies Calculate?

The type of taxes you pay are mainly dependent on your business structure and not the industry. Tax obligations often change on an annual basis, so it’s important to keep yourself regularly informed.

As a business owner, you must start planning for the following taxes.

1.   Employment tax

If your startup already has employees, you will have to file employment taxes to the federal government.

These taxes include income taxes that you withhold from the employees and submit it to the IRS on their behalf, including; Federal Insurance Contribution Act (FICA) taxes, Additional Medicare Tax, Federal income tax, and Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) taxes.

2.   Income tax

These are taxes imposed by the government on individuals and businesses based on their income. According to the law, income taxes should be filed annually, so that one is able to determine their tax obligations.

Income taxes are calculated based on the structure of your business (sole proprietorship, partnership, corporations). If your tech startup is a partnership, you won’t have to pay income taxes but will be required to file an information return.

3.   Excise tax

Excise tax is not mandatory for all businesses. It is only imposed on businesses that deal with manufacturing-specific goods (fuel, tobacco, alcohol, etc.) or those that use certain facilities and equipment or businesses. Most often, the excise tax translates as increased prices for the consumer. If you also sell tech products, find out if they are liable for excise tax and the forms you have to file.

4.   Self-Employment tax

For employees, the employer withholds a certain amount of money from their paychecks for Medicare taxes and social security. As an entrepreneur, however, you have to pay these taxes on your own via self-employment taxes.

Only 92.35% of your net income is subjected to this tax, and to calculate this, you deduct all your expenses from your gross earnings. There are exemptions to this tax, but generally, all earnings from self-employment above $400 should be taxed.

The Schedule SE on Form 1040 can be used to calculate this tax.

5.   Estimated taxes

This tax is imposed on income that is not subject to withholding, including interest, alimony, rent, dividends, etc. If you have additional income from other sources, it is advisable to conduct a paycheck checkup regularly, to avoid being hit with hefty bills at the end of the year. 

Let Incentax Help You Stay On Top of Your Taxes

Understanding the complex rules and requirements for tax incentives can be difficult and you may need a professional tax incentives advisor to help you navigate these murky waters. We are here to guide you on how you can get the most out of your tax credits and incentives.

Contact us today for a consultation on how you can effectively use your startup’s tax credits!